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Pregnant teens more likely to have poor mental health

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Toronto: Researchers have found that women who get pregnant during their teenage years are more likely to fall victim to poverty, have poorer mental health and have higher rates of substance use.

“Although teenage pregnancy has been declining in Canada over the past few decades, this does not mean that we have solved this social issue. The majority, 70 percent, of teenage pregnancies in this country are unintended,” said researcher Jamie Seabrook, Associate Professor at Brescia University College in Canada.

There are limited Canadian studies on teenage pregnancies, in particular looking at risk factors and birth outcomes compared to women who became pregnant during adulthood.

According to the study, published in the Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, researchers from Lawson Health Research Institute and Brescia University College, were able to take advantage of a large sample of pregnant women from Southwestern Ontario by accessing data from patients at London Health Sciences Centre.

Of the 25,363 pregnant women making up the total sample of the retrospective cohort study, 4.3 percent (1080) was 19 years old or younger.

Teenage pregnant women were much more likely than older pregnant women to live in poor, disadvantaged neighborhoods across Southwestern Ontario.

They were also more likely to have a history of depression and had higher rates of depression during pregnancy, with 10 percent on medication while pregnant.

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Looking at substance use, 41 percent of teenage women smoked cigarettes, 13 percent used cannabis and seven percent drank alcohol during pregnancy, which was significantly higher than rates for older pregnant women.

Once adjusted for other medical, behavioral and economic factors, teenage pregnancy was not associated with a higher risk for premature birth or low birth weight compared to pregnancy for women ages 20-34 years.

However, the infants had a higher risk of low Apgar scores.

An Apgar score, a test given to newborns soon after birth, indicates how well the baby is doing outside of the womb. Babies with very low Apgar scores are more likely to need assistance with breathing.

However, Apgar scores have little correlation with the long-term health of the baby.

Contrary to findings in the United States, where teenage pregnancy is associated with a higher risk for preterm birth and low birth weight, these recent results suggest that geographical context, differences in social inequality and type of health care system are important.

“There are so many factors associated with poor birth outcomes, and the advantage of our sample size and statistical modeling was that we were able to include key medical and behavioral factors which play a larger role than age,” said Jasna Twynstra, Associate Professor at Brescia University College.

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